Women’s cricket all the rage

Women’s cricket is taking off like never before with internationals flocking from around the world for Big Bash I this summer.
Leading cricketers from England, South Africa, New Zealand, the West Indies and India are soon to arrive for the 59-match, 51-day inaugural WBBL tournament.
Among those commanding particular attention were England skipper Charlotte Edwards and her teammates Catherine Brunt and Sarah Taylor. English internationals Kate Cross and Lauren Winfield committed early to the Brisbane Heat.
Eight of the WBBL matches, including the final on January 24, is being broadcast live and free on Network Ten.
The WBBL features eight clubs, all aligned with the eight franchises in the men’s KFC Twenty20 Big Bash League.
Southern Stars captain Meg Lanning is leading the Melbourne Stars, while champion allrounder Ellyse Perry is the frontline player for the Sydney Sixers. Holly Ferling will represent Brisbane Heat and Sarah Coyte the Adelaide Strikers.
‘We want cricket become the sport of choice for women and girls across the nation, whether as participants or fans, and the WBBL will play a really important part in helping us realise that vision,’ said Cricket Australia’s executive general manager of operations Mike McKenna.
McKenna said Australia’s Ashes victory in England and further free to air coverage of the final Twenty20 international in Cardiff was a further tonic to encourage fresh streams of teenage girls to play Australia’s national game.
Following the WBBL, the Australian XI will be looking to defend its Twenty20 world title in India in autumn.